External Advisory Board

Joyce Berry

Joyce Berry
Emeritus Dean, Warner College of Natural resources, Colorado State University

Joyce Berry is the former Dean of the Warner College of Natural Resources and Vice President of Advancement and Strategic Planning at Colorado State University. Prior to CSU, she was a Research Associate and Senior Administrator at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Her teaching focuses on natural resource and environmental policy and management, environmental leadership and gender and natural resources. Joyce’s early career focused on social survey research on public values, attitudes and behaviors toward wildlife and natural resources. Most of her work however concentrates on the integration of science, policy and management and collaborative involvement strategies. She has co-authored 4 books, 2 on Environmental Leadership, Forests to Fight Poverty and a Bibliography of Human-Animal Relationships.Current and past committee appointments include Chair, National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry; President, Council of Environmental Deans and Directors; Rapporteur, Seminar of experts on Sustainable Development of Boreal and Temporal Forests; Forest Research Advisory Committee to the Secretary of Agriculture; Board Member,  National Council on Science for the Environment; 7th American Forest Congress; and the Pinchot Institute for Conservation.  Governor appointments include Colorado Forest Advisory Committees, Colorado Center for Environmental Management and Connecticut Council on Environmental Quality.

Rosina Bierbaum

Rosina Bierbaum
Professor, School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan
Roy F. Westin Chair in Natural Economics, University of Maryland

Rosina M. Bierbaum focuses her research on the interface of science and policy--principally on issues related to climate change adaptation and mitigation at the national and international levels. She is a Professor in the School of Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan; from 2001-2011, she served as Dean and oversaw the creation of a new undergraduate program in the environment as well as five dual Master’s degrees across campus. As well, she is the Roy F. Westin Chair in Natural Economics at the University of Maryland.  Bierbaum is the Chair of the Science and Technical Advisory Panel of the Global Environment Facility. She served on President Obama's Council of Advisers on Science and Technology (PCAST), as an Adaptation Fellow at the World Bank, led the Adaptation Chapter for the Congressionally-mandated U.S. National Climate assessment, and was a review editor for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Rosina has served in both the Executive and Legislative branches of the U.S. Government--as the Senate-confirmed director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Environment Division, and in multiple capacities at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment.

Bierbaum is on the board of the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Federation of American Scientists, the Environmental and Energy Study Institute, and the Gordon E. and Betty I. Moore Foundation (among others).  She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Ecological Society of America.  Bierbaum received the American Geophysical Union’s Waldo Smith award for ‘extraordinary service to Geosciences’, and the Environmental Protection Agency’s “Climate Protection Award”.

Thomas Dietz

Thomas Dietz
Assistant Vice President for Environmental Research, Michigan State University

Thomas Dietz is a Professor of Sociology and Environmental Science and Policy (ESPP) and Assistant Vice President for Environmental Research at Michigan State University. At MSU he was Founding Director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program and Associate Dean in the Colleges of Social Science, Agriculture and Natural Resources and Natural Science. Dr. Dietz is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a recipient of numerous awards such as the Sustainability Science Award of the Ecological Society of America, the Distinguished Contribution Award and the Outstanding Publication Award, both from the American Sociological Association Section on Environment, Technology and Society, and the Gerald R. Young Book Award from the Society for Human Ecology. At the National Research Council he served as chair of the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change and currently is Vice Chair of the NRC Panel on Advancing the Science of Climate Change of the NRC America’s Climate Choices report. Dr. Dietz served as Secretary of Section K (Social, Economic, and Political Sciences) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is the former President of the Society for Human Ecology. He has a Ph.D. from University of California, Davis.

Maggie L. Fox

Maggie L. Fox
The Climage Reality Project

Maggie L. Fox is the President and CEO of The Climate Reality Project, a non-profit organization leading a campaign to help citizens around the world discover the truth about the climate crisis and bring about global change. Along with former Vice President Gore, Maggie has trained hundreds of climate educators from around the world, in Beijing, China, Jakarta, Indonesia, San Francisco, Istanbul, Turkey, and most recently Chicago. She is the past National President of America Votes, and the former Deputy Executive Director of the Sierra Club. With over 30 years experience working for progressive change, she is a veteran of numerous political, environmental and national issue campaigns. Maggie has consulted with a number of organizations and foundations on their energy and climate campaigns, including The Hewlett Foundation, The UN Foundation, The Western Conservation Foundation, Western Resource Advocates and The Better World Fund. She currently serves on the board of the Green Fund and Energy Future Coalition and was honored by the Women’s Council on Energy and the Environment as the 2010 Woman of the Year.

Rob Jackson

Rob Jackson
Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor, School of Earth Sciences, Stanford University
Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment
Senior Fellow, Precort Institute for Energy

Rob Jackson is Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor in Stanford’s School of Earth Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Precort Institute for Energy. While at Duke University, he and his colleagues published the first studies examining drinking water quality and shale gas extraction, as well as several studies on wastewater disposal and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMS).  He also examines hydrocarbon emissions upstream from wellpads and downstream in cities, including the first maps of natural gas leaks across urban pipelines in Boston and Washington, D.C.   In recent years Jackson directed the DOE National Institute for Climate Change Research for the southeastern U.S., co-chaired the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan, and currently co-chairs the Global Carbon Project (www.globalcarbonproject.org).

Thomas E. Lovejoy

Thomas E. Lovejoy
University Professor, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University

Thomas Lovejoy is an innovative and accomplished conservation biologist who coined the term “biological diversity”. He serves as Senior Fellow at the United Nations Foundation. In 2010 he was elected University Professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University. He served as President of the Heinz Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment from 2002-2008 and was the Biodiversity Chair of the Center from 2008-2013. Before assuming this position, Lovejoy was the World Bank’s Chief Biodiversity Advisor and Lead Specialist for Environment for Latin America and the Caribbean as well as Senior Advisor to the President of the United Nations Foundation. Spanning the political spectrum, Lovejoy has served on science and environmental councils under the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations. At the core of these many influential positions are Lovejoy’s seminal ideas, which have formed and strengthened the field of conservation biology. He was the first to use the term “biological diversity” in 1980. In the 1980s, he brought international attention to the world’s tropical rainforests, and in particular, the Brazilian Amazon, where he has worked since 1965. In 1980 he produced the first projection of global extinctions for the Global 2000 Report to the President. Colorado State University proudly presented Lovejoy with a Honorary Doctor of Science in 1989. Lovejoy also developed the now ubiquitous “debt-for-nature” swap programs and led the Minimum Critical Size of Ecosystems project. With two co-edited books (1992 and 2005), he is credited with founding the field of climate change biology. He and Lee Hannah are working on the Second Edition of Climate Change and Biodiversity. He also founded the series Nature, the popular long-term series on public television. In 2001, Lovejoy was awarded the prestigious Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement. In 2009 he was the winner of BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Ecology and Conservation Biology Category. In 2009 he was appointed Conservation Fellow by the National Geographic. In 2012 he was recognized by the Blue Planet Prize. Lovejoy holds B.S. and Ph.D (biology) degrees from Yale University.

W. Berry Lyons

W. Berry Lyons
Director, School of Earth Sciences, Ohio State University

Berry Lyons is a Professor and the Director of the School of Earth Sciences at the Ohio State University. Lyons' research group currently conducts research on a number of topics including the biogeochemistry of Antarctic aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and how they respond to climate change, the consequences of urbanization, suburbanization and agricultural practices on water quality and quantity, and the impact of human activities on global geochemical cycles. Dr Lyons is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Geophysical Union. He is currently the Chief Officer of the GeoSciences-SSG, one of the three Standing Scientific Groups of the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR), and is a former Director of the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State. He has won GSA's Israel C. Russell Award for lifetime innovation and service to the field of limnogeology and limnology, and is a Lowell Thomas Awardee of the Explorers Club. He is currently the International Association of GeoChemistry's Ingerson International Lecturer. Prior to his taking the position at Ohio State, he was a faculty member at the University of New Hampshire, the University of Nevada, Reno, and the University of Alabama.

James B. Martin

James B. Martin
Senior Counsel, Beatty & Wozniak, P.C.

Jim Martin joined the Denver firm Beatty & Wozniak, P.C. as senior counsel in June of 2013. Jim brings to the team a wealth of knowledge and experience in environmental and natural resources law, the legislative and administrative process and the political arena, as well as in academia. He looks forward to applying that experience to helping clients solve permitting and compliance issues, interact with agencies and legislators, and look at the “big picture” of energy resource development. Jim most recently was the Regional Administrator for EPA’s Region VIII. This position entrusted Jim with the ultimate responsibility for all federal environmental laws in six western states and in 26 tribal nations. Jim worked in the environmental field for nearly 30 years, most recently as the executive director of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources and the executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Prior to his career in public service, Jim managed a nonprofit focused on energy, water issues, and public lands, and spent a decade as the senior attorney for the Environmental Defense Fund. He also headed the Natural Resources Law Center at the University of Colorado School of Law, where he managed an interdisciplinary public policy think tank and taught advanced seminars. Jim has a Bachelor's degree from Knox College and a law degree from Northwestern Law School, Lewis & Clark College.

Jonathan Patz

Jonathan Patz
Director, Global Health Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Professor, and John P. Holton Chair in Health and the Environment

Jonathan Patz, MD, M.P.H., is professor and John P. Holton Chair in the Environment, and director of the Global Health Institute at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. For the past 15 years, Patz served as a lead author for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (or IPCC)—the organization that shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. He also co-­chaired the health expert panel of the U.S. National Assessment on Climate Change, a report mandated by the U.S. Congress. Patz has written over 90 peer­‐reviewed scientific papers, a textbook addressing the health effects of global environmental change and, most recently, co‐edited the five­‐volume Encyclopedia of Environmental Health (2011). He has been invited to brief both houses of Congress and has served on several scientific committees of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Patz served as Founding President of the International Association for Ecology and Health.

Bill Ritter, Jr.

Bill Ritter, Jr.
Director, Center for the New Energy Economy

Former Governor Bill Ritter was elected Colorado's 41st governor in 2006.   During his four-year term, Ritter established Colorado as a national and international leader in clean energy by building a New Energy Economy. After leaving the Governor’s Office, Ritter founded the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University, which works with state and federal policy makers to create clean energy policy throughout the country.  Governor Ritter has authored a book that was recently published entitled, Powering Forward – What Everyone Should Know About America’s Energy Revolution.

Osvaldo Sala

Osvaldo Sala
Julie A. Wrigley and Foundation Professor, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University
Chair, SoGES External Advisory Board

Osvaldo Sala is the Julie A. Wrigley Professor at Arizona State University, where he contributes to both the School of Life Sciences and School of Sustainability. He came to ASU in 2010 from Brown University where he was the founding Director of the Environmental Change Initiative and the Sloan Lindemann Professor of Biology. Sala has explored several topics throughout his career from water controls on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in arid and semi-arid ecosystems to the consequences of changes in biodiversity on the functioning of ecosystems, including the development of biodiversity scenarios for the next 50 years. His work is reflected in more than 170 peer-reviewed publications and several edited books. Osvaldo Sala served in numerous international institutions and in different capacities from the Scientific Committee of Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), where he was the president, to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). Sala has served as member of the Advisory Board to the Director of the National Science Foundation in issues of environmental research and education, editor of Global Change Biology, the president of the Argentinean Society of Ecology, and a member of the governing board of the Ecological Society of America. Osvaldo Sala is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Argentinean National Academy of Sciences, and the Argentinean National Academy of Physical and Natural Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Scott J. Sternberg

Scott J. Sternberg
President, Vaisala Inc.

Scott Sternberg serves as President of Vaisala Inc., Vaisala's US subsidiary. Vaisala is a global leader in environmental and industrial measurement technologies, ideally positioned to meet its customers' requirements of safety, efficiency and sustainability. Vaisala is a leading manufacturer of professional weather and controlled environment systems and solutions. Scott is responsible for the regional governance of Vaisala’s US-based operations.

Scott has held the position of Executive Vice President of Service where he was responsible for the consolidation of Vaisala’s global customer service functions.  In this capacity Scott served as an expatriate on assignment from 2007 to 2009 at Vaisala headquarters in Finland.  Scott joined Vaisala in 2004 as the Strategic Business Unit Manager for Vaisala's Thunderstorm Data unit based in Tucson, Arizona U.S.A. where he managed the data products generated from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN).

Prior to joining Vaisala, Scott held a number of positions ranging from product management to business development for Roper Industries-Photometrics. Here he specialized in providing advanced digital imaging solutions to scientific applications.

In addition to his Vaisala responsibilities, Scott serves on the Board of Trustees for the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) and as Chairman of the Board of Directors for CO-LABS.

Scott holds both a BS and MS in Physics from SUNY, College at Cortland and Colorado State University respectively.